Great Transformation

Thursday

26 September 2019
Great Transformation
Image: Sarah Cords

Please mind that only events in English language will be presented on this page. Please check the corresponding German pagede for all events.

All events shown below are in chronological order.

After the Arab Spring: Young People in North Africa and the Middle East

Panel discussion 9.00 – 10.00 a.m. // Lecture Hall 1

Organised by: DFG-Kollegforscher_innengruppe Postwachstums-gesellschaften (Jena)

The abstract for this event will follow shortly.

Discussants: Mabrouka M’Barek (Tunis, TN), Jörg Gertel (Leipzig)

Lucio Baccaro (Cologne, DE): Growth Models in Europe: Which Future?

Lucio Baccaro Lucio Baccaro Image: MPIfG / Thekla Ehling

Keynote at 9–10 a.m. // Lecture Hall 2

Prof. Dr. Lucio Baccaro is Managing Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies and Professor for Macro-sociology at the University of Geneva. Main areas of work include: political economy of growth models, comparative industrial relations, global justice.

Studying "growth models" provides a privileged access to understanding both the general trajectory of capitalism and its national variants, since capitalist societies depend decisively for their reproduction on their being able to redeem expectations of material improvement. Drawing on the "growth model perspective", a new theoretical framework bringing together comparative and international political economy (Baccaro and Pontusson 2016; Baccaro, Blyth and Pontusson 2019), the presentation will provide an overview of recent growth models both before and after the crisis, and will address the question of which growth models are compatible with the current economic architecture of the Euro zone. In conclusion, the implications of a future without growth for the stability of capitalism will be considered.

Experiences of degrowth practices based on care for humans and the more-than-human world

Forum event (›Shapes of Post-Growth Societies‹) at 10.30 a.m. – 1 p.m. // UHG (Fürstengraben 1), Lecture Hall 144

Organised by: Christine Bauhardt (Berlin, DE), Gülay Çağlar (Berlin, DE)

We would like to contribute to the debate on post-growth societies from a Feminist Political Ecology background. By building on examples of "doing the economy otherwise" we would like to share experiences with commoning and other care practices that recognise non capitalocentric economies. Our starting point is a denaturalized concept of care – for oneself, for other people, for the more-than-human world. 
The lived experiences of practising Feminist Political Ecology are rooted in alternative values and visions of social reproductive activities and practices, creating networks, relationships, non-monetary exchange relations based on empathy for the world around us. Such visions mean recognising the environmental, political and social crises we are in by "Staying with the trouble"(Haraway) and acknowledging that we need to adapt and shape a new world out of the messiness of the social and natural environments we have created. 
The event will be an interactive open workshop based on storytelling practices of hope linked to academic analysis bringing together scholarly and activist feminists working in various urban and rural contexts and from various disciplines and political visions.

Inputs:
  • Meike Brückner (Berlin, DE), Suse Brettin (Berlin, DE): Sustainable consumption and food practices in Northern Europe and East Africa
  • Marlene Gómez Beccera (Berlin, DE): Alternative Food Initiatives in Berlin and Barcelona
  • Jihad Yagoubi (Berlin, DE): Environmental Justice Movements in the Global South

Shapes of socio-ecologically sustainable mobility regimes

Forum event (›Shapes of Post-Growth Societies‹) at 10.30 a.m. – 1 p.m. // MMZ 028 (Multimediazentrum), Ernst-Abble-Platz 8, 07743 Jena

Organised by: Noel Cass (Lancaster, GB), Katharina Manderscheid (Hamburg, DE)

The growth of transport and of the economy are inseparably linked. For personal transport, in present societies, the private car constitutes the hegemonic mode of movement. Yet, car based personal transport constitutes a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Despite all socio-political attempts to reduce these emissions, the distances travelled by private car as well as the average size of the car engines continuously grow and counteract technologically-induced improvement of efficiency or the increase of alternative modes of travel within cities. To tackle these problems, sustainable transport policy debates suggest environmental impacts have primarily technological solutions, such as electrification, automated driving or smart traffic control. Such ‘technical’ solutions ignore systemic issues, the increasing compulsions to travel, social injustices and freedom constraints in the automobile-centred mobility system.

We argue that rather than ‘greening’ automobility, we need to question ‘compulsions to be mobile’ in order to reconcile environmental and justice dimensions of ‘sustainable’ mobility: understanding the automobility system to be unsustainable and unjust, curtailing freedoms to pursue capabilities and flourishings, without being forced to move. The event we propose here explores radical concepts of autono-mobile futures in post-growth societies. This requires focussing on mobility as an integral part of everyday lives, and addressing the socio-economic implications of its sustainable transformation. We demand practical utopias, and discussion of their conditionalities and implications, rather than a limiting questioning of their feasibility within a growth paradigm.

Inputs:
  • Peter Cox (Chester, GB): Vélomobility as Autono-mobility: prefigurative dimensions of cycling imaginaries
  • Anna Nicolaeva (Amsterdam / Utrecht, NL), Jan Duffhues (Amsterdam, NL): Commoning mobility: a dialogue
  • Benjamin Stephan (Hamburg, DE): Electric Auto(no)-mobility: Transforming the German transport sector to become climate neutral by 2035
  • Ka-Hin Tsang (London, GB): Autonomising Mobile Experience: Rights to Desired Mobilities Beyond the Cars
  • Kim Carlotta von Schönfeld (Wageningen, NL): Revaluing mobility based on intrinsic, human and qualitative values: a sustainable and desirable alternative to speed and economic efficiency?
  • Luca Nitschke (München, DE): Non-commercial carsharing: A local and direct organization of sustainable mobility

Lecture abstracts by the speakers [pdf 209KB]

Shapes of socio-ecologically sustainable mobility regimes

Forum event (›Shapes of Post-Growth Societies‹) at 10.30 a.m. – 1 p.m. // MMZ 028 (Multimediazentrum), Ernst-Abble-Platz 8, 07743 Jena

Organised by: Noel Cass (Lancaster, GB), Katharina Manderscheid (Hamburg, DE)

The growth of transport and of the economy are inseparably linked. For personal transport, in present societies, the private car constitutes the hegemonic mode of movement. Yet, car based personal transport constitutes a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Despite all socio-political attempts to reduce these emissions, the distances travelled by private car as well as the average size of the car engines continuously grow and counteract technologically-induced improvement of efficiency or the increase of alternative modes of travel within cities. To tackle these problems, sustainable transport policy debates suggest environmental impacts have primarily technological solutions, such as electrification, automated driving or smart traffic control. Such ‘technical’ solutions ignore systemic issues, the increasing compulsions to travel, social injustices and freedom constraints in the automobile-centred mobility system.

We argue that rather than ‘greening’ automobility, we need to question ‘compulsions to be mobile’ in order to reconcile environmental and justice dimensions of ‘sustainable’ mobility: understanding the automobility system to be unsustainable and unjust, curtailing freedoms to pursue capabilities and flourishings, without being forced to move. The event we propose here explores radical concepts of autono-mobile futures in post-growth societies. This requires focussing on mobility as an integral part of everyday lives, and addressing the socio-economic implications of its sustainable transformation. We demand practical utopias, and discussion of their conditionalities and implications, rather than a limiting questioning of their feasibility within a growth paradigm.

Inputs:
  • Peter Cox (Chester, GB): Vélomobility as Autono-mobility: prefigurative dimensions of cycling imaginaries
  • Anna Nicolaeva (Amsterdam / Utrecht, NL), Jan Duffhues (Amsterdam, NL): Commoning mobility: a dialogue
  • Benjamin Stephan (Hamburg, DE): Electric Auto(no)-mobility: Transforming the German transport sector to become climate neutral by 2035
  • Ka-Hin Tsang (London, GB): Autonomising Mobile Experience: Rights to Desired Mobilities Beyond the Cars
  • Kim Carlotta von Schönfeld (Wageningen, NL): Revaluing mobility based on intrinsic, human and qualitative values: a sustainable and desirable alternative to speed and economic efficiency?
  • Luca Nitschke (München, DE): Non-commercial carsharing: A local and direct organization of sustainable mobility

Lecture abstracts by the speakers [pdf 209KB]

New Directions of Social Change in Latin America? Structural Trends, Right Turns and New Challenges

Forum event (›Fields of Transformation‹) at 3 – 5.30 p.m. // Carl-Zeiss-Straße 3, SR 207

Organised by: Johanna Sittel (Jena, DE)

Discussants: Karina Batthyány (Executive Secretary of CLACSO; Montevideo, UY), Esteban Torres (Córdoba, AR), Guilherme Leite Gonçalves (Rio de Janeiro, BR), Maristella Svampa (La Plata, AR)

The following panel discussion proposes to open a sociological debate of plural character with respect to the central problems and the situation that defines the current conjuncture in Latin America, as well as with respect to the social movements of resistance and expansion that seek to influence the direction of the processes of social change on the continent. The panel will offer new interpretations on the multidimensional crisis that Latin American countries are going through, on the advance of the right wing in Brazil, the expansion of the feminist movement, the territorial struggles against the extractive apparatuses, as well as on the general tendencies that have been accentuated in the last decades since the precipitation of the neoliberal cycle on a global level. Sociological interpretations will be accompanied by new categories and new conceptual frameworks willing to deepen, from a left perspective, the clarification of the new contradictions that are being constituted in Latin America at the crossroads between systems of capitalist, patriarchal, ecological and imperialist appropriation. Finally, the roundtable will try to define a series of new challenges that could collaborate in updating the social change programs of the different left-wing social actors in Latin America.

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